Board Logo
« Herbs for your health & what they do »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jan 17th, 2018, 5:41pm



Archives
Important Info


Clicking on the scroll bar is a quick and easy way to navigate through a thread

Visit our Frequently Asked Questions board to learn more tips.





This Board houses those subjects that have proven to be of great interest to our members. New topics will be added, so check back from time to time.



"If you have knowledge, let others light their candles in it.”--Margaret Fuller
Need Help?

Frequently Asked Questions

Global Moderators and Administrators

Kathi (Painter)
Lendi
Fancy
Notonline (Danny)

« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 2  Notify Send Topic Print
 hotthread  Author  Topic: Herbs for your health & what they do  (Read 1834 times)
JackieF
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

In all things budget & Balance!


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 9066
xx Herbs for your health & what they do
« Thread started on: Oct 4th, 2003, 09:47am »

http://www.herbalgram.org/default.asp?c=common_herbs

Aloe Vera (Aloe ferox, A. barbadensis). Internally, concentrate Aloe ferox resin is used as a strong laxative. Externally, the clear gel from the A. barbadensis leaf, is used to treat burns, abrasions, skin injuries, and in cosmetic products. A juice made from the gel is used as a drink by many consumers.




Astragalus (Astragalus membranaceous). Used in traditional Chinese and East Indian medicine for its immune-enhancing and tonic properties. Research has indicated its usefulness as a supportive tool for a variety of chronic immune problems.

Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus). A European version of blueberry. Bilberry extract is rich in purple/blue pigments having numerous benefits for the eyes and cardiovascular system. In Europe, bilberry extract is used as an antioxidant. Also used to help increase microcirculation by stimulating new capillary formation, strengthening capillary walls and increasing overall health of the circulatory system.

Cascara Sagrada (Rhamnus purshiana). The bark is used as a stimulant laxative, especially in cases of chronic constipation. The name "sagrada" refers to "sacred bark"—a name given to it by early Spanish explorers in the Pacific Northwest. As an approved, safe and effective laxative, cascara and cascara extracts are found in numerous over-the counter laxative preparations in the U.S.

Capsicum (Cayenne, hot pepper) (Capsicum species). Internally, cayenne acts as a circulatory stimulant, induces preparation, and is used to stimulate digestion. Several over-the-counter products for external use in arthritic and rheumatoid conditions contain capsaicin, the hot principle in the oil of capsicum, as the active pain relieving ingredient. Topical capsaicin preparations are also used for the relief of pain associated with herpes zoster ("shingles
« Last Edit: Oct 4th, 2003, 09:48am by JackieF » User IP Logged

Jackie F
JackieF
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

In all things budget & Balance!


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 9066
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #1 on: Oct 4th, 2003, 09:50am »

Chamomile (German) (Matricaria recutita). Used internally, chamomile flowers are antispasmodic and used to relieve digextive upset. A popular remedy for indigestion, flatulence, gastrointestinal spasms, and inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Often used as a bedtime beverage, its mild sedative effects have not been adequately scientifically proven. Externally, chamomile extracts are useful for inflammation of skin and mucous membranes.

Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon). Recent research suggests that cranberry helps to prevent urinary tract infections caused by E. coli bacteria, particularly in people with a history of recurrent infections. Cranberry is an excellent example of how common foods can have health benefits beyond their nutritional qualities.

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale). The young leaves are widely used as salad greens and in tea as a natural diuretic. The roots are a mild laxative and promote bile flow and liver function.

Dong Quai (also spelled Tang kwei or Danggui) (Angelica sinensis). One of the most widely used herbs in traditional Chinese medicine, it is primarily used in herbal formulas as a "female tonic" to treat muscle cramps and pain associated with difficult menstrual periods. Dong quai should not be used during pregnancy.

Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea and related species). Also called Purple Coneflower and native to the U.S., this plant was the most widely used medicinal plant of the Central Plains Indians, being used for a variety of conditions. The leaf and root are mildly antibacterial, antiviral, and used for wound healing. German research has confirmed, in numerous clinical studies, the usefulness of Echinacea purpurea in strengthening the body's immune system as well as prevention and natural treatment of colds and flu.

Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng) (Eleutherococcus senticosus). This distant relative of true ginsengs grows in Siberia, Manchuria, China and Northern Japan. It has been used by Russian cosmonauts and olympic team members as a general tonic and to reduce physical and mental stress. In Germany, Siberian Ginseng is approved as a tonic to invigorate and fortify the body during fatigue or weakness and to increase work and concentration as well as an aid in patient rehabilitation.

User IP Logged

Jackie F
JackieF
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

In all things budget & Balance!


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 9066
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #2 on: Oct 4th, 2003, 09:50am »

Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis)). Evening primrose oil (EPO) is a relatively recent entrant in the herbal remedy world, having been marketed for only about 20 years. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) such as gamma linolenic acid (GLA) found in EPO are vital components of cellular structure; a deficinecy of EFAs may be responsible for a host of conditions and diseases, including cardiovascular ailments, menstrual irregularities, arthritic inflammation and hyperactivity in children. The oil, usually available in capsule form, and taken orally, has been demonstrated to be effective in the symptoms of PMS.

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium). Feverfew has analgesic (pain-relieving) properties. It has been used as a folk medicine for menstrual cramps since Greco-Roman times. At least three published clinical studies in England in the 1980s confirm the efficacy of feverfew leaves for prevention and moderation of the severity of migraine headaches.




Garlic (Allium sativum). Garlic mildly displays a host of benefits: it is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, hypotensive (lowers high blood pressure), and lowers cholesterol and fat in the bloodstream. Garlic is used in Europe as an approved remedy for cardiovascular conditions, especially high cholesterol and triglyceride levels associated with risk of atherosclerosis. It is also generally regarded as a preventive measure for colds, flu and other infectious diseases.

Ginger (Zingiber officinale). Ginger is another great example of how a plant can be used as a food, spice or medicine. It has been used to treat nausea, motion sickness and vomiting. Ginger has a long history of use for all types of digestive upset and can be helpful to increase appetite.





Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba). Standardized extract of ginkgo leaf increases circulation and has shown antioxidant activity. Hundreds of European studies have confirmed the use of standardized ginkgo leaf extract for a wide variety of conditions associated with aging, including memory loss and poor-circulation. Ginkgo extract is also used clinically in Europe for tinnitus (ringing in the ears), vertigo, and cold extremities.

Asian Ginseng (Panax ginseng). One of the world's most famous herbs. Ginseng is classed as an "adaptogen," a relatively recent term coined by Russian researchers to describe ginseng's general tonic properties. Adaptogens are herbs that increase the overall resistance to all types of stress. Other herbal adaptogens include Astragalus, Siberian Ginseng and Schizandra. Asian Ginseng (Chinese and Korean) is renowned for its ability to increase energy and endurance.

Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis). Goldenseal root has a long history as a native American herb used by Indians and early settlers for its antiseptic wound-healing properties. It is also used for its soothing action on inflamed mucous membranes. A popular remedy for colds and flu.


User IP Logged

Jackie F
JackieF
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

In all things budget & Balance!


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 9066
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #3 on: Oct 4th, 2003, 09:51am »

Hawthorn (Cratagus oxyacantha). Hawthorn has a long reputation in both folk medicine and clinical medicine as a heart tonic. In Europe, hawthorn berry preparations are widely used by physicians in heart conditions, such as mild forms of angina. Hawthorn is safe to use for extended periods of time, according to European studies.

Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra and G. uralensis). Licorice is one of the most widely used medicinal plants in the world, commonly used in European, Arabian and Asian traditional medicine systems. It is soothing to inflamed mucous membranes; often recommended in treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcers and cough and asthma rememdies. Licorice extract displays a stimulating action on adrenal glands and is thus useful in fatigue due to adrenal exhaustion. Licorice and its extracts are safe for normal use in moderate amounts. However, long-term use or ingestion of excessive amounts can produce headache, lethargy, sodium and water retention, excessive loss of potassium, and high blood pressure.

Milk Thistle (Silybum marianum). Milk Thistle has a long history of use in European folk medicine as a liver tonic. Silymarin from milk thistle has shown a protective effect against many types of chemical toxins, as well as alcohol. An extract of milk thistle is used to improve liver function, protect against liver damage and enhance regeneration of damaged liver cells. clinical studies have confirmed the usefulness of standardized milk thistle extracts in cases of cirrhosis, toxic liver and other chronic liver conditions.

Passion Flower (Passiflora incarnata). Contrary to the implications of its name, passion flower is not a stimulant, nor does it incite passion; instead, it has mild sedative and calmative properties. Taken internally, passion flower is usually combined with other sedative herbs for various types of nervous conditions, including insomnia and related disorders.

Peppermint (Mentha piperita). Internally, peppermint has an antispasmodic action, with a calming effect on the stomach and intestinal tract. As a tea, extract, or in a capsule, peppermint is useful for indigestion, cramp-like discomfort of the upper gastrointestinal and bile duct, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammation or irritation of the gums.

Psyllium (Plantago ovata and P. Major). Psyllium is a major source of fiber. The primary use of psyllium seed and/or psyllium seed husks is as a bulk laxative, especially for cases of chronic constipation. The tiny seeds contain a coating of gelatinous material, which swells upon contact with moisture. This increases the movement (motility) within the colon thus producing a bowel movement. Psyllium husk is an approved over-the-counter laxative.

Saw Palmetto (Sabal) (Serenoa repens; Sabal serrulata). Saw palmetto extract is a popular remedy for enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hypertrophy—BPH), a condition common in men over 50 years of age. This should be used only after proper diagnosis by a physician. Clinical studies indicate that the extract can increase urine flow and reduce frequency of nighttime urination.

User IP Logged

Jackie F
JackieF
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

In all things budget & Balance!


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 9066
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #4 on: Oct 4th, 2003, 09:52am »

Senna (Cassia senna). Both senna leaves and pods (fruits) were used in ancient Arab medine as safe and effective laxatives. Today, senna is recognized as one of the most popular and reliable stimulant laxatives. Use of senna is generally regarded as safe. However, as with all stimulant laxatives, long-term dependence may develop. Short-term use only is recommended.

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis). Valerian is an effective and reliable sedative and sleep aid. It is effective in conditions of anxiety, insomnia and nervous irritability. Unlike prescription or OTC sleep and anxiety medication, it is not habit-forming, nor does it produce a hang-over-like side effect.

Vitex (Chaste Tree) (Vitex agnus-castus). The small fruits of this Mediterranean tree have been used for menstrual disorders by women since Greco-Roman times. Extract of vitex is a plant preparation which adjusts the monthly menstruation cycle on a natural basis and causes premenstrual discomforts to subside or completely disappear. An extract of vitex is approved in Germany for menstrual disorders, PMS and painful breasts.

Witch Hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The astringency of the leaves and bark makes witch hazel a popular ingredient for various skin conditions as well as for bruises and varicose veins. It is approved for use in hemorrhoid products.

Conditions Which May be Treatable with Herbs:

The following is a list of conditions and/or diseases that often can be prevented or treated by the actions of herbs. Frequently, herbs are used in combination within various formulas. We do not list the formulas, but include names of major herbs that provide benefits for the conditions noted. Also, some of the herbs listed below are not explained above.

Alcohol Abuse: Milk Thistle (Silymarin), Kudzu

Anxiety: Valerian, Passion Flower

Arthritis: Devil's Claw, Boswellia, Evening Primrose Oil

Blood Pressure: Garlic, Hawthorn

Cholesterol (High): Garlic, Gugulipid

Circulation (Poor): Ginkgo biloba, Garlic, Cayenne, Hawthorn

Colds/Flu: Echinacea, Astragalus, Garlic, Goldenseal Root

Constipation: Aloe, Cascara sagrada, Senna, Psyllium

Coughs: Licorice, Wild Cherry Bark, Thyme

Depression (Mild): St. John's Wort, Valerian

Detoxification: Milk Thistle (Silymarin)

Digestion (Poor): Chamomile, Peppermint, Ginger

Fatigue: Panax Ginseng, Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng)

Hemorrhoids: Horse Chestnut, Witch Hazel (topical)

Insomnia: Valerian, Passion Flower, Hops, Lemon Balm

Liver Dysfunction: Milk Thistle (Silymarin)

Memory Loss: Ginkgo biloba

Migraine Headache: Feverfew

Menstrual Irregularities/PMS: Dong Quai, Vitex agnus-castus, Evening Primrose Oil

Nausea: Ginger, Chamomile, Peppermint

Prostate Enlargement (Benign): Saw Palmetto, Pygeum africanum, Stinging Nettle Root

Skin Conditions: Calendula, Chamomile (topical), Tea Tree Oil (topical)

Stress/Tension: Valerian, Passion Flower, Kava Kava, Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng)

Ulcers: Licorice, Aloe juice

Urinary Tract Problems: Cranberry, Uva Ursi

Varicose Veins: Horse Chestnut, Bilbery, Witch Hazel (topical)

Water Retention: Uva Ursi, Dandelion Leaf

User IP Logged

Jackie F
Suzanne
New Member
Image


member is offline

Avatar



AIM
PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 10
thumbup Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #5 on: Oct 4th, 2003, 6:39pm »

I've been looking for a complete list and useage for herbs for a long time. I started a herb garden this spring and will continue to add to it each year. Thanks.
Suzanne
User IP Logged

One day at a time.
MsDee
Senior Member
ImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

Don't cry because it's over; smile because it happened.


PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 385
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #6 on: Oct 5th, 2003, 10:30am »

Jackie....Would you consider "pinning" this thread somewhere?

I can't arrange to save it on my 'puter right now...and...my printer's sick...and...you know I'll lose this wonderful compilation of All-One-Needs-to-Know-About-Herbs if it isn't stuck up on the wall for me.

Thank you for posting this for us...............MsDee
User IP Logged

"When you come to the edge of all the light you know, and are about to step off into the darkness of the unknown, faith is knowing one of two things will happen: there will be something solid to stand on, or you will be taught how to fly."

~ Barbara J. Winter
amvinyc
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar



AIM
Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 987
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #7 on: Oct 5th, 2003, 11:29pm »

This is just a caution. Some herbs don't go with some medicines
Polyherbacy Prompts Need for Physician
University of Iowa Health Science Relations
First Published: 2003
Last Revised: August 2003
Peer Review Status: Internally Peer Reviewed

http://www.vh.org/adult/patient/internalmedicine/prose/polyherbacy.html

Two University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics physicians are calling attention to the issue of polyherbacy, the excessive or inappropriate ingestion of herbs for the treatment or prevention of disease, especially in older patients.

Jose Ness, M.D., UI assistant professor of internal medicine, and Nicole Nisly, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine and director of the UI Complimentary and Alternative Medicine Clinic, published a letter on polyherbacy in the May issue of the Journal of Gerontology.

The physicians said that oftentimes patients take herbal supplements in conjunction with their regular medicine regimen. However, combining conventional medications with herbal supplements without first talking to your physician can lead to possible adverse interactions with medication or illness.

Prior to taking an herbal supplement, a patient should have established a treatment goal, researched reliable sources for herbal information and consulted with their physician or pharmacist about safety and efficacy of the herbs.

"Patients should always discuss with their primary physician any medication, herbal or conventional, they're taking," Ness said. "Physicians can then find out about possible side effects and help prevent unexpected complications."

Patients should also talk to their physician or pharmacist about conventional treatment options that are available to ensure the proper and best treatment is given, Nisly said.

"A patient is more likely to begin taking herbal supplements if they do not see desired results from more conventional methods," Nisly said.

Herbal supplements should not be used by children or anyone who is pregnant, lactating or receiving chemotherapy, HIV treatment, transplant medications or anticoagulants, due to increased risk of adverse side effects.

Commonly used herbs include

Ginseng
Ginkgo biloba
Garlic
St. Johns Wort
Aloe
Echinacea
Sea algae and licorice are commonly found in multi-ingredient supplements.

Possible side effects can include:

Headache
Abdominal pain
Fatigue
Nausea
More serious side effects can include excessive bleeding or interaction with other drugs, resulting in excessive or diminished drug function, Nisly said.

Each herb can come in several forms, each different enough to cause differing side effects. "It is important to remember that just as with other medications, it is possible to experience an allergic reaction to an herbal supplement," Ness said.

While serious herbal complications are not common, Ness noted, caution is a must. The sicker a patient is, the more likely he or she is to experience such adverse reactions.

Ness added that there is a lack of standardization in herbal manufacturing, which is not approved or regulated by the Food and Drug Administration. Some supplements are produced with quality control standards similar to drug production, but some are not. Concerns with misidentified herbs and contaminants need to be kept in mind by both consumers and health care professionals.

Reading bottle labels is a valuable resource for learning about a product. The more information a label provides about dosage, ingredients, company reputation and contact info, the better. Patients should look for single-herb supplements known for safety and efficacy from reliable manufacturers. Doctors need to be informed about herbal uses, interactions and side effects, so they are best able to counsel patients on safe herbal use.

"Doctors need to remember to listen with an open mind when patients talk about their preferred method of treatment, or the patient might withhold information such as herbal use," Ness said.

Ness and Nisly agree that the most important thing to remember when beginning any medication is to talk honestly and openly with your primary physician, in order to ensure the best care and safest use possible.

Possible side effects of commonly used herbs:

Garlic: blood thinning
Gingko Biloba: blood thinning
St. Johns Wort: interaction with AIDS medication and chemotherapy; interference with organ transplant acceptance and anti-depressants
Ginseng: hypertension (high blood pressure) or hypotension (low blood pressure) (depending on type of ginseng); vaginal bleeding
Sea algae: interference with thyroid function due to iodine content
Licorice: hypertension
User IP Logged

Healing Hugs,
Anne-Marie
If you can talk you can sing,
If you can walk, you can dance.
amvinyc
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar



AIM
Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 987
xx Re: Mixing Herbs and Meds part 1
« Reply #8 on: Oct 5th, 2003, 11:41pm »

Herb and drug interactions: 'Natural' products not always safe
http://www.mayoclinic.com/invoke.cfm?objectid=9F7C4783-8C98-4FF1-90CA8C470E032926

By Mayo Clinic staff
You may think herbal supplements are safe because they're labeled "natural." But many herbal supplements contain active ingredients that can harm you if taken with certain prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) drugs.

In addition, some medical situations increase your risk of adverse effects if you take herbal products. Talk to your doctor before taking any herbal products if you're pregnant or breast-feeding or if you have:

High blood pressure
Thyroid problems
Depression or other psychiatric problems
Parkinson's disease
Enlarged prostate gland
Blood-clotting problems
Diabetes
Heart disease
Epilepsy
Glaucoma
History of stroke or organ transplant
It's a good idea to talk to your doctor about any herbal supplements you take, no matter what type of medication you're using or the condition for which you're being treated.

Here are 14 herbs and the prescription and OTC drugs you shouldn't take with them:

Capsicum
Avoid taking with:

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors — used for diabetic kidney disease, heart failure, high blood pressure
Theophylline (Elixophyllin, Adophyllin) — an asthma medication
Sedatives
Antidepressants
Capsicum may increase the absorption and the effect of these drugs. It may also increase the likelihood of developing a cough if used with ACE inhibitors.

Coenzyme Q-10
Avoid taking with:

Warfarin (Coumadin) — a blood-thinning medication
Chemotherapy
The use of warfarin and coenzyme Q-10 together increases your risk of excessive bleeding. Coenzyme Q-10 may reduce the effectiveness of some chemotherapy. Some drugs, such as those used to lower cholesterol (lovastatin, pravastatin, simvastatin), blood sugar (glyburide, tolazamide) and blood pressure (beta blockers such as Inderal, Lopressor), can alter coenzyme Q-10's effectiveness. Also, people with diabetes should be aware that coenzyme Q-10 may decrease their need for insulin.

Dong quai
Avoid taking with:

Warfarin (Coumadin) — a blood-thinning medication
St. John's wort
Antibiotics (sulfonamides, quinolones)
The combination of dong quai and warfarin may increase your risk of bleeding. Using St. John's wort or certain antibiotics with dong quai may increase your skin's sensitivity to the sun.

Echinacea
Avoid taking with:

Anabolic steroids
Amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) — used to treat an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia)
Methotrexate (Rheumatrex) — used to treat rheumatoid arthritis
Ketoconazole (Nizoral) — an antifungal medication
Cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) — an immunosuppressant
HIV protease inhibitors — human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) medications
Benzodiazepines (Alprazolam, Valium) — anti-anxiety medications
Calcium channel blockers — used to treat high blood pressure and heart disease
Echinacea shouldn't be combined with other drugs that can cause liver damage. And because this herb may stimulate the immune system, it may interfere with the effects of immunosuppressants.

Echinacea may also elevate the levels of HIV protease inhibitors, calcium channel blockers and anti-anxiety drugs in the blood, increasing your risk of side effects.

User IP Logged

Healing Hugs,
Anne-Marie
If you can talk you can sing,
If you can walk, you can dance.
amvinyc
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar



AIM
Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 987
xx Re: Mixing Herbs and Meds Part 2
« Reply #9 on: Oct 5th, 2003, 11:45pm »

Ephedra
Avoid :

Caffeine
Decongestants
Stimulants
Heart drugs
Antidepressants
Beta-adrenergic agonists — asthma inhalers
Theophylline (Elixophyllin, Adophyllin) — an asthma medication
Ephedra by itself has been shown to increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, seizures or death. Combined with the above drugs, it becomes even more risky. Ephedra is a potent herb that's present in many products, especially those designed to give you pep or help you lose weight. It goes by many names, such as ma-huang, herbal ecstasy, mahuang, mahuanggen and ma huang root. Any "natural" product that claims to cause weight loss or increase energy may have ephedra in it. Carefully review the product's contents with your doctor or pharmacist before assuming it doesn't.

Feverfew
Avoid :
Aspirin
Ticlopidine (Ticlid) — blood-thinning medication
Clopidogrel (Plavix) — blood-thinning medication
Dipyridamole (Persantine) — blood-thinning medication
Warfarin (Coumadin) — blood-thinning medication
These medications can reduce blood clot formation. Feverfew may increase this effect, causing spontaneous and excessive bleeding.

Garlic
Avoid :

Aspirin
Ticlopidine (Ticlid) — blood-thinning medication
Clopidogrel (Plavix) — blood-thinning medication
Dipyridamole (Persantine) — blood-thinning medication
Warfarin (Coumadin) — blood-thinning medication
Cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) — an immunosuppressant
Saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase) — an HIV protease inhibitor
Combined with garlic, anticoagulant medications may cause spontaneous and excessive bleeding. Garlic may decrease the effectiveness of immunosuppressants and HIV protease inhibitors.

Garlic may cause lower levels of blood sugar, which may decrease your need for insulin if you have diabetes. If you take insulin and garlic together, monitor your blood sugar carefully and report any changes to your doctor.

Ginger
Avoid :

Aspirin
Ticlopidine (Ticlid) — blood-thinning medication
Clopidogrel (Plavix) — blood-thinning medication
Dipyridamole (Persantine) — blood-thinning medication
Warfarin (Coumadin) — blood-thinning medication
H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors — acid-blocking medication
Ginger may increase the effect of anticoagulants, which may cause excessive bleeding. It may also increase the production of stomach acid, which could counteract the effects of antacid medications.

Ginger may lower your blood pressure or blood sugar levels, which may reduce your need for blood-pressure-lowering medications or insulin if you have diabetes. Monitor your blood pressure or blood sugar levels if you take these medications and report any changes to your doctor.

Ginkgo
Avoid :

Aspirin
Ticlopidine (Ticlid) — blood-thinning medication
Clopidogrel (Plavix) — blood-thinning medication
Dipyridamole (Persantine) — blood-thinning medication
Warfarin (Coumadin) — blood-thinning medication
Antidepressants
Antipsychotic medications
Insulin
Ginkgo may increase the anticoagulant effect of these drugs and has the potential to cause spontaneous and excessive bleeding when used in conjunction with these medications. It can also increase the amount of antidepressant medication in your blood. When combined with antipsychotic medications, ginkgo may cause seizures. Ginkgo also affects insulin levels, so if you're taking the two together, monitor your glucose levels carefully.

Ginseng
Avoid taking with:

Warfarin (Coumadin) — blood-thinning medication
Phenelzine (Nardil) — an antidepressant
Digoxin (Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin) — heart medication
Insulin and oral antidiabetic medications
Used with warfarin, ginseng can increase your risk of bleeding problems. Ginseng with phenelzine may cause headache, trembling and manic behavior. Ginseng may interfere with digoxin's pharmacologic action or the ability to monitor digoxin's activity.

Ginseng can reduce blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes (formerly called adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes). Without careful glucose monitoring, the use of ginseng with insulin or oral antidiabetic medications may cause dangerously low blood sugar levels.

Ipriflavone
Avoid:

Warfarin (Coumadin) — blood-thinning medication
Antipsychotics
Tacrine (Cognex) — an Alzheimer's disease medication
Theophylline (Elixophyllin, Adophyllin) and zafirlukast (Accolate) — asthma medications
Caffeine
Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) — a cancer treatment and prevention medication
Cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril) — a muscle relaxant
Celecoxib (Celebrex) — pain-relieving arthritis medication
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications — pain-relieving medication
Ipriflavone affects the way these drugs are metabolized, usually increasing the levels of the medications in the blood and the effects of the drugs.


User IP Logged

Healing Hugs,
Anne-Marie
If you can talk you can sing,
If you can walk, you can dance.
amvinyc
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar



AIM
Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 987
xx Re: Mixing Herbs and Meds part 3
« Reply #10 on: Oct 5th, 2003, 11:46pm »

Kava
Avoid :

Sedatives
Sleeping pills
Antipsychotics
Alcohol
Drugs used to treat anxiety or Parkinson's disease
Combined with these drugs, kava can produce deep sedation and, in some cases, even coma. In late 2001, following reports from Europe of liver problems in several people who used kava, the Food and Drug Administration started investigating the safety of this herb. Until more is known, don't start taking kava or products that contain kava. If you already do so, contact your doctor for advice and ask if you need liver function tests to check for unexpected liver problems. Don't take kava if you have a history of liver problems, if you're depressed, or if you take antidepressants or prescription sedatives.

Melatonin
Avoid:

Nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia) — used to lower blood pressure and treat heart disease
Fluvoxamine (Luvox) — an antidepressant
Melatonin may reduce nifedipine's ability to lower blood pressure, which could lead to an increased heart rate and blood pressure level if these drugs are taken together. Fluvoxamine slows the metabolism of melatonin, which may result in excessive sleepiness.

St. John's wort
Avoid taking with any prescription medications. In particular, avoid taking St. John's wort and:

Antidepressants
HIV protease inhibitors — used to treat HIV/AIDS
Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors — used to treat HIV/AIDS
Digoxin (Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin) — heart medication
Theophylline (Elixophyllin, Adophyllin) — an asthma medication
Cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) — an immunosuppressant
Chemotherapy
Oral contraceptives
Nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia) and diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor) — blood pressure and heart disease medications
Warfarin (Coumadin) — blood-thinning medication
Alcohol
Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) — a cancer treatment and prevention medication
St. John's wort has been shown to affect your body's metabolism of all of these drugs. Many other drugs are likely to be affected, too. Until more is known about St. John's wort's ability to alter the metabolism of pharmaceutical medications, it's probably best not to combine such medications with St. John's wort.

Also, the combination of St. John's wort with some antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, may cause an excess of serotonin (serotonin syndrome). Typical symptoms include headache, stomach upset and restlessness.

St. John's wort may reduce the effectiveness of some oral contraceptives. Use another form of birth control while taking St. John's wort.
User IP Logged

Healing Hugs,
Anne-Marie
If you can talk you can sing,
If you can walk, you can dance.
JackieF
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

In all things budget & Balance!


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 9066
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #11 on: Oct 6th, 2003, 08:04am »

Good addition Anne Marie!
User IP Logged

Jackie F
amvinyc
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar



AIM
Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 987
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #12 on: Oct 6th, 2003, 09:37am »

I was looking for a more comprehensive link that people could use to see what herbs and meds go together or not. Unfortunately, I did not find it. I may not have looked hard enough. I will try, because a link that would allow people to check would be most useful.
Hugs,
Anne-Marie
User IP Logged

Healing Hugs,
Anne-Marie
If you can talk you can sing,
If you can walk, you can dance.
JackieF
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

In all things budget & Balance!


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 9066
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #13 on: Oct 6th, 2003, 09:40am »

Karen & Ros--I think it was--have a site that will compare the meds you take--with any herbs or other meds you want to use.

With Ray's heart condition--I always must check--don't want any complications should another emergency arise.

Another reason I alwasy tell/suggest to members that they keep a written copy of all meds--& herbs/supplemnts taken with them & give to the every doc they visit!
User IP Logged

Jackie F
Jeweller
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

I'm out of my mind. Back in 5 minutes...


PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 1185
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #14 on: Oct 6th, 2003, 09:46am »

This is the one, I think, Jackie? http://www.hollandandbarrett.com/healthnotes/index.htm?Hcontent=all_index It's been reformatted since the last time I looked at it, but the info is all still there. The safety checkers by herb and medication are very useful...

Ros
User IP Logged

Pages: 1 2  Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »



Disclaimer: This site is not operated nor endorsed by any medical professionals. All posts are the opinions
and comments of the participants. We are not responsible for any medical or non-professional opinions.

This site is for support and provides a forum for sharing coping tips and skills. No one should rely upon any opinion
or comment contained herein for the purposes of medical treatment or attention. You are urged to consult with your
physician prior to engaging in any sort of medical treatment that may be suggested through this site.

No representation or warranties are made for the content of the opinions or comments and should not be considered as medical advice.

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls