Board Logo
« Herbs for your health & what they do »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jan 17th, 2018, 5:44pm



Archives
Important Info


Clicking on the scroll bar is a quick and easy way to navigate through a thread

Visit our Frequently Asked Questions board to learn more tips.





This Board houses those subjects that have proven to be of great interest to our members. New topics will be added, so check back from time to time.



"If you have knowledge, let others light their candles in it.”--Margaret Fuller
Need Help?

Frequently Asked Questions

Global Moderators and Administrators

Kathi (Painter)
Lendi
Fancy
Notonline (Danny)

« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 2  Notify Send Topic Print
 hotthread  Author  Topic: Herbs for your health & what they do  (Read 1835 times)
JackieF
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

In all things budget & Balance!


Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 9066
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #15 on: Oct 7th, 2003, 06:23am »

Thanks Ros!! Such a great site!!
User IP Logged

Jackie F
cgrymm
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar



AIM
PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 574
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #16 on: Oct 10th, 2003, 09:03am »

I was just lent wonderful book that I am really impressed with.

Healthy Healing by Linda Page.

It is very comprehensive with info on all types of alternative health care, herbal healing, healing programs for specific conditions, healing diets, and detox plans.

Now I am going to have to go out and buy one.

Chris
User IP Logged

amvinyc
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar



AIM
Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 987
xx Re: Herbs for Health Magazine Pt !
« Reply #17 on: Oct 12th, 2003, 5:13pm »

http://www.herbsforhealth.com/10_03/boost_imm.html

Boost Your Immunity

Get ready for fall and winter with these powerful immune boosters.

Elderberry extract is a tasty medicine that helps protect against disease.
By Kris Wetherbee

The last decade alone has seen an influx of infectious diseases and virulent strains increasingly unaffected by conventional treatments. Overuse and abuse of antibiotic medicines and antibacterial products have turned the war on germs into a war on humankind as once-common bacteria and viruses mutate to new levels of resistance. According to an article in Science (August 1992), "doctors in hospitals and clinics around the world are losing the battle against an onslaught of new drug-resistant bacterial infections and other diseases that are costly and difficult, if not impossible, to treat."

You might not be able to avoid the onslaught of bacteria, viruses and other germs capable of wreaking havoc in your body. However, you can take the offensive by revving up your immune system so your body can more effectively resist whatever diseases come your way.


Lavender is useful for immunity because it calms anxiety, which can run down the immune system.
Running on Empty

Everyday life is full of encounters from any number of pathogens and foreign substances that can infiltrate and attack your body. Your immune system defends your body against these invaders. An intricate network of cells, tissues and organs, your immune system fights back by detecting and destroying any substance that doesn't belong in your body.

But when your immune system is compromised, a breakdown occurs that can make you more susceptible to diseases and infections. Physical, psychological and social factors ranging from sustained stress and environmental toxins to poor diet and lifestyle choices can leave your body running on empty. For example, high cholesterol and alcohol can suppress immune activity that fights infection, and sustained stress affects hormone levels that regulate immune functions. Refined sugars and excess natural sugars can weaken your immunity as well. According to a 1977 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, drinking 24 ounces of sugary soda depressed infection-fighting white blood cell activity by 50 percent for about five hours after consumption.

Fortunately, nature has provided plants that can enhance and restore immune function. Scientific studies are verifying the immune-boosting and antimicrobial actions of botanical medicines and their synergistic mix of plant-based chemicals that may help prevent diseases from colds to cancer.

The Familiar Five

Goldenseal contains berberine, a compound that aids the body in fighting infections. Photo by Christopher Hobbs. Herbs like echinacea (Echinacea spp.), Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng), eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus), garlic (Allium sativum) and green tea (Camellia sinensis) have become common household names, and with good reason. They all possess elements that modulate, activate or enhance immune function and the antimicrobial properties that fight disease.

One of the most popular is echinacea, which contains a number of antioxidant compounds and immune-stimulating constituents that can help the immune system fight off illness. According to a University of Florida study, echinacea was shown to stimulate threefold the activity of infection-fighting immune-system cells. Taken at the first sign of illness, the dosage can make a difference between you beating the bug or the bug beating you. "Three to four capsules a day is inadequate when you get sick," Majid Ali, an herbalist and acupuncturist in Santa Monica, California, says. When symptoms are really bad, Ali has his patients take one or two capsules (300 to 400 mg each) every hour or two for the first 24 to 48 hours (until they feel better), then continue with one or two capsules four times daily for three to five days after symptoms disappear.

Garlic is a potent antioxidant packed with antimicrobial compounds like cancer-fighting sulfur and the immune-boosting mineral selenium. Perhaps the most beneficial compound in garlic is allicin. Heating or cooking garlic inactivates the enzyme that produces allicin, but if garlic is chopped and allowed to sit for 10 minutes before cooking, enough allicin is formed to maintain the healthful benefits. Exposing garlic to heat for as little time as possible (lightly sautéing, for example) will help retain its enzyme activity. Of course, the best way to enjoy the healthful properties of garlic is to consume one raw clove a day, but many people find raw garlic difficult to digest.

User IP Logged

Healing Hugs,
Anne-Marie
If you can talk you can sing,
If you can walk, you can dance.
amvinyc
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar



AIM
Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 987
xx Re: Boost your Immune System Pt 2
« Reply #18 on: Oct 12th, 2003, 5:15pm »

Active antioxidants also can be found in green tea, Asian ginseng and eleuthero. In studies, green tea has shown the ability to modulate immune function. Preliminary research suggests that the amino acid L-theanine works to boost the capacity of specific T cells that act as the body's first line of defense against infection. Asian ginseng improved immune response according to one Italian study conducted at the University of Milan, and the results of a German study demonstrated a drastic increase in the number of immune cells in healthy volunteers taking eleuthero.

Targeting Immune Stressors
Stress is a necessary fact of life and unavoidable at best. At its worst, continual stress can run down your immune system, leaving the gates wide open for infectious invaders. In fact, stress has been shown to suppress immunity up to 60 percent. However, there is an upside. A UCLA study concluded that any reduction in stress improves immune system function.

Besides directly supporting your immune system, herbs can indirectly improve immune status by helping your body cope with stress and its effects. Asian ginseng can help fortify during times of mental or physical fatigue. Siberian ginseng is useful when dealing with environment stressors such as excessive noise, air pollution or working overtime. Help for frayed nerves can be found in herbs that calm anxiety, such as reishi, gotu kola (Centella asiatica), chamomile (Matricaria recutita), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and passionflower (Passiflora incarnata).

Stress also can keep you from getting a good night's sleep. Researchers found that when sleep is disrupted, the numbers of natural killer cells decrease, thereby weakening immune function. Herbs can help for those fitful nights when sleep evades you. Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) has been shown to improve sleep quality and reduce nighttime awakenings; hops (Humulus lupulus) acts as a sleep inducer; and skullcap (Scutellaria lateriflora) puts worries to bed, so you can get a good night's rest.

Powerful Plant Protectors

While the name recognition of these botanical wonders may not be as common as the familiar five, their immune-enhancing qualities are just as significant. Elderberries (Sambucus nigra) contain anthocyanins, a group of antioxidants that increase the production of cytokines, which help protect the body against disease. Studies published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine also suggest that elderberries actually can prevent a number of viral strains from replicating.

Ashwaganda (Withania somnifera), an Ayurvedic herb also known as Indian ginseng, is said to have adaptogenic properties that improve the body's ability to withstand adverse conditions while normalizing its immunity functions. Several animal studies conducted in India on the immune-boosting effects of ashwaganda have shown a significant increase in white blood cell counts and platelet counts.

Schisandra (Schisandra chinensis) acts as an adaptogen as well, according to Earl Mindell, Ph.D., author of Prescription Alternatives (McGraw Hill, 2003). "Schisandra has a stimulating effect on the central nervous system without causing heart palpitations or anxiety," Mindell says.

Rhodiola (Rhodiola rosea), also known as arctic root, is yet another adaptogenic herb that restores normal functioning of the immune system. "Almost everyone in the country could be helped with this herb, as adrenal exhaustion is so common, especially if you consume caffeine," Mindell explains. "It helps the body cope with stress, which I think is one of the biggest problems Americans face."

Astragalus (Astragalus membranaceus) not only functions as an adaptogen, it also stimulates natural killer cells and elevates interferon, a protein that prevents viruses from replicating. The outcome of one study (published in World Science) involving 1,000 people with lowered immunity resulted in fewer colds and reduced symptoms after taking astragalus. Astragalus also holds promise as an anti-cancer agent. Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Center in Houston were able to completely restore the function of cancer patients' damaged immune cells using astragalus extracts in an in vitro study.

User IP Logged

Healing Hugs,
Anne-Marie
If you can talk you can sing,
If you can walk, you can dance.
amvinyc
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar



AIM
Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 987
xx Re: Boost your immune sytem Part 3
« Reply #19 on: Oct 12th, 2003, 5:17pm »

Biological Defenders

Fighting a Cold or Flu
Immune-boosting herbs are most effective when taken as preventives or at the very first sign of illness. Though prevention is preferred, there will likely be times when outside forces get the better of your immune system and you end up succumbing to the seasonal cold or flu. Herbal antibiotics like echinacea, garlic and licorice can help you fight back. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and Oregon grape (Mahonia aquifolium) contain phytochemical compounds, including berberine, a natural alkaloid that increases infection-fighting white blood cells.

If your medicinal cupboard is bare, you might still find relief in your herb and spice rack. The astringent and antiseptic tannins found in basil and sage are great for reducing oral inflammation. Try a warm sage tea and salt gargle to cool down the pain and inflammation of a sore throat. The menthol in peppermint and the anti-inflammatory actions of capsicum - found in cayenne - make powerful decongestants for opening up mucous membranes.

Studies involving the immune-activating properties of fungi may still be in their infancy, but specialty mushrooms have been used in Oriental medicine for more than 2,000 years. Medicinal mushrooms are rich sources of the active anti-cancer agent beta-glucan, a polysaccharide that activates immune cells and increases antibodies that regulate the development of defense responses. Reishi mushroom (Ganoderma lucidum) is a noted antioxidant that has demonstrated antibacterial effects against strep and the bacteria that lead to pneumonia. Cordyceps is another immune-modulating medicinal mushroom that possesses anti-tumor properties and stimulates tumor necrosis factor, a cytokine protein that destroys cancer cells.

Usnea (Usnea spp.), a lichen born from a symbiotic union between fungi and algae, is a powerful immune stimulator. A study published in the Romanian Journal of Physiology found its broad-spectrum antibiotic activity to be more effective than penicillin against certain bacteria, without destroying the good bacteria normally found in the intestines. Its mucilage action also helps shrink swollen mucous membranes and is great for soothing sore throats.

Food Fortification

Let's face it: Vital nutrients necessary for maintaining a healthy immune system are sorely lacking, perhaps even nonexistent, in the high-fat and sugar-laden highly processed food culture of today. Combined with the onslaught of chemical residues and added foreign substances, it would seem that the average diet is starving for essential vitamins and minerals needed for proper immunity.

In Beyond Antibiotics (North Atlantic Books, 1994), Michael Schmidt writes, "There is growing evidence that vitamin and mineral deficiency can lead to diminished immunity and increased infection susceptibility." Seeking out food sources rich in immune-boosting nutrients - such as beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, lutein, lycopene, selenium and zinc - can help prevent nutrient deficiencies.

User IP Logged

Healing Hugs,
Anne-Marie
If you can talk you can sing,
If you can walk, you can dance.
amvinyc
Member Extraordinaire
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar



AIM
Homepage PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 987
xx Re: Boost your immune system Part 4
« Reply #20 on: Oct 12th, 2003, 5:18pm »

....
"Our public health people recommend seeing your physician or health-care professional if you suspect you might have SARS," he says. "But they confess there isn't much they can do but provide supportive treatment. They all say contagious diseases are more likely to gain a foothold in, infect and even kill those with compromised immune systems.

"It simply stands to reason that the corollary is that a strong immune system renders the acquisition of most contagious diseases - among them anthrax, SARS, smallpox and West Nile virus - less likely. Strengthening the immune system can be preventive."
Duke suggests lifestyle changes to boost the immune system, including:

A good diet featuring lots of fresh fruits and vegetables (nine servings a day)
A daily multivitamin
Relax and reduce stress
Think positive
Exercise, but don't overdo it. Take in some fresh air every day - walk in the garden, stroll
around your neighborhood, sit on a park bench - just make sure you breathe deeply.
Take herbs reported to boost immunity when contagious diseases are going around.
Garlic leads the list of herbs Duke recommends, because it contains at least 15 immune-boosting chemicals, 10 antiviral agents and at least 24 antibacterial compounds. It has been proven synergistic with many of the pharmaceutical antibiotics, which are losing their punch due to multiple drug resistance.

Try the whole garlic, not the "deodorized" version, he says. "The more it stinks, the better its success as an antiseptic, immune booster and mosquito repellant." (Mosquitoes carry the West Nile virus.)

Green tea also is high on the list of herbs Duke recommends.

"Experiments show that immune system blood cells of tea drinkers responded five times more rapidly to germs than did the blood cells of coffee drinkers," he says. "The process by which the liver breaks down tea prompts the secretion of interferon, an important part of the body's chemical defense against infection."

Concerned about contagion? Here's Duke's advice: "I'd prop up my feet on a foot stool and drink green tea with cinnamon, ginger and vanilla, while avoiding the depressing TV news that might counteract the immune-boosting propensities of my herbal concoction," he says.

Even if the echinacea and garlic you take as preventives enhance your immune system by only 1 or 10 percent, Duke says, that at least improves your chances of resisting disease.
"I'll take that chance over doing nothing, or passively hoping my qualified health-care professional can see me in time and has the silver bullet that will make me well," he says.
-K.C. Compton

Many vegetables and fruits are rich in beta-carotene, especially sweet potatoes, carrots, winter squash, broccoli, cantaloupe and apricots. Vitamin C functions as an antibacterial and antiviral player, and powerhouse sources of this nutrient include oranges, sweet peppers, strawberries and kiwis. Vitamin E is a well-known antioxidant that also takes part in regulating immune function. Whole grains, nuts and seeds are some of the richest sources.

Selenium-rich foods include seafood, whole grains, organ meats, garlic and onions. Zinc helps boost immune response, and foods like turkey, lean lamb and beef, liver and pumpkin seeds can boost levels of zinc, a mineral U.S. Department of Agriculture studies have shown is lacking in the diets of 83 percent of American women. Antioxidant-rich carotenoids, such as lycopene and lutein, may help enhance immune response and protect immune cells from oxidative damage. Some of the highest food sources for lycopene include tomatoes, red grapefruit and watermelon. Abundant sources of lutein can be found in leafy green vegetables, such as spinach and kale.

A Final Word
Cantaloupe is a good source of beta-carotene, a nutrient that helps boost immunity.
Remember that pre-existing health conditions - from hypertension to cancer - as well as prescription medications, menopause and pregnancy can have a direct effect on what herbs are best to take, along with when and how to take them. For example, licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) can be used as a preventive for colds and flu but would be inappropriate for someone taking high blood pressure medication.

Timing also can play a crucial part in infection prevention. "Some herbs, like echinacea, are natural antibiotics, and if taken continuously, they lose their efficacy," Ali explains. During cold and flu season, Ali advises his patients to take echinacea for just one week, followed by two weeks of astragalus and reishi. A second rotation of echinacea/astragalus is then followed by a week off of the herbs.

User IP Logged

Healing Hugs,
Anne-Marie
If you can talk you can sing,
If you can walk, you can dance.
hollym
Junior Member
ImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 74
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #21 on: Dec 18th, 2003, 2:54pm »

Wow, I like that safety checker site a LOT, have been looking for one that is user friendly and quick. It has a lot of other great stuff on it too! Thanks!

hollym
User IP Logged

Victoria
Full Member
ImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 237
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #22 on: Dec 30th, 2003, 9:18pm »

I didn't see this mentioned, altho I admit that I was kind skimming at points! And I don't know what you'd classify this as an herb exactly...

Anyway, I just found out about this about 3 weeks ago, just in time, as I have the mother of all bladder infections.

This seems to be a repeat of what happened to me 12 yrs ago when I ended up having to be on antibiotics continuously for 3 months with repeated cultures taken. I have now taken 3 courses of antibiotics since September, the last in November, but was again getting an infection. I have been using d-mannose successfully, and continuously as I figure this is lots better than taking antibiotics continuously. So far, so good, for the past 3 weeks!
******
D-MANNOSE, a simple sugar and close cousin of glucose, can cure more than 90 percent of all UTIs within 1 to 2 days. Even more remarkably, D-mannose accomplishes this feat without killing a single bacterium! Exactly how does this will be explained later. Suffice it to say that, because it gets rid of UTI-causing bacteria without committing "bacteriacide," people who use it suffer none of the unwanted side effects of antibiotics: no GI problems, no yeast infections, no resistant bacteria. In fact, D-mannose has no adverse side effects of any kind. ...The "molecular mechanism" of the action of D-mannose on E. coli is scientifically proven.

Because it is so effective and so benign, women (even pregnant women) who are susceptible to recurrent UTIs can safely take D-mannose as a preventive measure to head off future attacks. D- mannose is also ideally suited for children with UTIs.

User IP Logged

Victoria
Full Member
ImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 237
xx Re: Herbs for your health & what they do
« Reply #23 on: Dec 30th, 2003, 9:18pm »

Treating UTI Naturally with D-Mannose: When faced with a potentially pathogenic germ like E. coli, conventional, pharmaceutically based medicine typically confronts the problem by throwing the most potent poisons it can find at the bugs -antibiotics. While there's nothing essentially wrong with killing disease-causing bacteria, this approach does have some very serious drawbacks, as we have noted earlier. Happily, "bacteria-cide" is not the only possible avenue of attack.

Another, more natural way to eliminate E. coli infections from the urinary tract is to beat them at their own game. If they're going to cause trouble, bacteria usually have to find a way to adhere (stick) to the body tissue they're infecting. In UTI, E. coh attach to cells lining the bladder and urinary tract using filmy, hair-like projections called fimbria on their cell walls.[6]

At the tip of each fimbrium is a glycoprotein (a combination carbohydrate and protein) called a lectin that is programmed to bind to the first molecule of the sugar mannose that it encounters.[7]

It turns out that molecules of mannose (produced inside urinary tract lining cells) naturally dot the surfaces of these cells. Here they act as "receptors," inviting the fimbria of E. coli to attach, and allowing them to bind to the tissue in a tight, Velcro- like grip.[7]   If not for this attachment to the cell's mannose, any E. coli that had successfully ventured up the urethral river would be unable to stick to the slippery surface and would be washed right back out on the next tide of urination.

What happens when we take D-mannose to treat a UTI?  Now imagine what would happen to E. coli in the urinary tract if those sweet mannose molecules they crave were present not just on the surface of the epithelial cells but surrounding them in the urine as well.

The E. coli couldn't turn around without bumping into D-mannose "just floating around" in the urine. Unable to resist the tasty bait they suddenly find themselves swimming in, they would latch onto the nearest mannose molecules, and happily sail off into the porcelain sunset. Those. few E. coli left clinging to mannose molecules on cells then become easy prey for white blood cells and other agents of the immune system.

How Taking D-Mannose can Treat or Prevent UTI:
In addition to its natural occurrence in the cells lining the epithelial tract, the sugar D-mannose is also found in relatively large quantities in fruit such as peaches, apples, oranges, and certain berries, like cranberries and blueberries. Extracted in the form of D-mannose, a white crystal sugar similar to glucose, it can be easily dissolved in a liquid and swallowed. (Mannose can also be synthesized from other simple sugars.)

When someone with UTI consumes a dose of D-mannose, the sugar is absorbed in the upper GI tract, but at a much slower rate than most other sugars. (For example, glucose is absorbed more than eight times faster.) Moreover, unlike other sugars, D-mannose is not readily converted to glycogen (and stored) in the liver, but instead passes directly into the bloodstream largely unchanged." [7, 11, 12]

As the D-mannose-laden blood passes through the kidneys, a considerable proportion of the sugar is extracted and added to the urine. The D-mannose- sweetened urine flows from the kidneys through the ureters to the bladder and on to the urethra, literally sugar-coating any free-floating E. coli it might encounter, so they can't stick to cells any more. It also unsticks most of the E. coli already "Velcro-ed" to the inner surface of the bladder and urinary tract, ultimately flushing them all down the drain. "
-----

I found it at my Health Food Store - comes in a powder form that you mix into water or juice, doesn't taste bad at all.

Victoria
User IP Logged

Pages: 1 2  Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »



Disclaimer: This site is not operated nor endorsed by any medical professionals. All posts are the opinions
and comments of the participants. We are not responsible for any medical or non-professional opinions.

This site is for support and provides a forum for sharing coping tips and skills. No one should rely upon any opinion
or comment contained herein for the purposes of medical treatment or attention. You are urged to consult with your
physician prior to engaging in any sort of medical treatment that may be suggested through this site.

No representation or warranties are made for the content of the opinions or comments and should not be considered as medical advice.

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls